July 2017
One of the predicted benefits of self-driving vehicles is improved mobility and access for those unable to drive. The extent to which this happens, however, will depend not just on marketplace competition, but also on public policy decisions that ensure an equitable transportation system. This is the conclusion of a new analysis by researchers at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. The researchers also lead a task force that is examining strategies for Minnesota.
As the movement to promote bicycling as a means of transportation has grown, so has the amount of money governments and nonprofit organizations are investing in the nation’s urban bicycling infrastructure. A concern, however, is whether these investments are distributed equitably among neighborhoods. In a new study, U of M researchers looked at this issue using Minneapolis as a case study and found that though inequities still exist, equity is improving.
The Global Transit Innovations program coordinated a study-abroad course in spring semester 2017. The course—PA 5880: High-Density Urban and Regional Development in China—was offered by the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. U of M coordinators took 16 students to Shanghai, Suzhou, Nanjing, Shenzhen, and Hong Kong for the intensive two-week course, which explored how Chinese cities are working to satisfy the mobility and accessibility needs of the largest urban population in the world.
Pedestrian safety and access to healthful foods were some of the issues tackled by U of M students during the 2016–2017 academic year as part of the U’s Resilient Communities Project (RCP). In its fifth year, RCP—a program of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs—partnered with the City of Brooklyn Park to advance an array of the city’s strategic priorities. RCP connects communities in Minnesota with U of M faculty and students through collaborative, course-based projects.