February 2017
Minnesota’s quality of life depends on transportation. That was true 30 years ago, when CTS was established, and it’s true today. CTS has been a catalyst for innovation in all facets of transportation—from traffic operations to pavement design and much more. To celebrate our first 30 years, CTS will look back at highlights of our research, education, and engagement accomplishments. We’ll show how research progresses over time to lead to new knowledge, which in turn becomes the innovation that makes transportation better.
Transportation funding continues to be a contentious issue in Minnesota: Are we spending enough, too little, too much? One way to help answer that question is to compare spending with other states. U of M researchers developed a cost-adjusted approach to systematically compare highway expenses among states. They found that while Minnesota spends more than average on highways, its spending level actually ranks low in cost-adjusted measures.
According to the results of a new study, bicycle commuting in the Twin Cities metropolitan area reduces chronic illness and preventable deaths, saving millions of dollars annually in medical costs. The findings are one component of a multifaceted project funded by the Minnesota Department of Transportation. In the final report, researchers in several U of M departments provide a comprehensive understanding of the economic impact and health effects of bicycling in Minnesota.
Last semester, 39 students in the U’s Master of Urban and Regional Planning degree program explored ways to integrate a Minneapolis neighborhood—the North Loop (Nolo)—in the sharing economy. In their class, student teams created 13 proposals on topics such as parking reallocation, bike sharing, and walkability. They showcased their work in more than 100 posters at an exhibit in December.