September 2016
A new report from the University’s Accessibility Observatory estimates the accessibility to jobs by auto for each of the 11 million U.S. census blocks and analyzes these data in the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas. The research team also calculated the reduction in job access due to congestion. The Minneapolis–St. Paul metro area ranked 12th in terms of job accessibility but 23rd in the reduction in job access due to congestion.
U of M researchers have developed a way to identify the exact location of “hot spots” for air pollutants created by transit buses—work that could be used to create new strategies for addressing emission hot spots in the future. Researchers discovered that buses driving their routes often emit NOX emissions at much higher levels than during certification testing, particularly routes with frequent stops. They were also able to pinpoint the conditions under which increased NOX emissions were most likely to occur.
To make progress in the seemingly unending task of pothole repair, U of M researchers are designing durable patches and repairs that are quick to apply and less costly for maintenance budgets. In a new report, researchers present two improved options for pothole repair that are ideally suited to Minnesota’s cold and wet conditions. The two repair options, which make use of taconite materials, have the potential to reduce traffic disruption caused by the frequent repair of repeatedly failing patches.
The conference, November 3 on the Minneapolis campus, will feature two plenary presentations. In the opening session, author Gabe Klein will present “Creating Sustainable, Livable, Forward-Compatible Cities for Economic Resilience.” In the luncheon session, Assistant Professor Bryant Walker Smith will discuss “How to Promote and Prepare for Automated Driving.”