Research Reports

Validation Study - On-Road Evaluation of the Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System - Stop Sign Assist Sign: CICAS-SSA Report #5

Principal Investigator:

Mick Rakauskas, Janet Creaser, Michael Manser, Justin Graving, Max Donath

August 2010

Report no. CTS 10-35

Projects: CICAS Stop Sign Assist (SSA) System

Topics: Safety, Traffic Modeling and Data, Traffic Operations

The CICAS-SSA sign is a roadside driver support system that is intended to improve gap rejection at rural stop-controlled intersections. The CICAS-SSA system tracks vehicle locations on a major roadway and then displays a message to a driver on the minor road via an active LED icon-based sign. The basis of this sign is a "Divided Highway" sign that is commonly presented in traffic environments. Overlaid on the roadways of the sign are yellow or red icons that represent approaching vehicles that are at a distance at which the driver on the minor road should proceed with caution or at a distance that is considered unsafe to enter the intersection.

Previous research conducted in a driving simulation environment indicated potentially beneficial changes in driver decision-making relative to approaching vehicle gap sizes and indicated that drivers perceive the system as being both useful and satisfying. While simulation-based evaluations provide a wealth of useful information, their ability to replicate the full array of behavioral, cognitive, and perceptual elements of a driving environment do have some limitations. It is because of these limitations that it is useful to confirm simulation-based findings in a real-world environment.

The primary goal of the current work was to evaluate the candidate CICAS-SSA sign in a real-world setting to confirm previously identified benefits and identify any unintended consequences of sign usage. This goal was accomplished through a validation field test performed at the intersection of US Highway 52 and County Road 9 in Southern Minnesota. The findings of the work are summarized in this report.

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